Panels

  • VIP - Transitioning Research into Re-useable Open Source or Commercial Software
  • On the Death of Scientific Visualization
  • How data visualization and regulation meet on the modern web
  • How can we improve empirical research on understanding visual information?
  • Application Papers: What are they and how should they be evaluated?
  • Pathways for Theoretical Advances in Visualization
  • Critical Visualization

VIP - Transitioning Research into Re-useable Open Source or Commercial Software

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25TH
2:00PM-3:40PM
Location: Holiday 6

Organizer: Alan Keahey
Panelists: Jeff Baumes, Hank Childs, Jock MacKinlay, Dan Rope, John Stasko

What are the key factors that determine whether results from the visualization research community will attain significance in practical usage? This panel will explore success stories in transitioning visualization research into more widely used systems. The panelists represent a cross section of visualization specializations (infovis, visual analytics, media and scivis).

On the Death of Scientific Visualization

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26TH
10:30AM-12:10PM
Location: Key 1+2+5

Organizer: Bob Laramee
Panelists: Mike Kirby, David Laidlaw, Klaus Mueller, Han-Wei Shen, Anders Ynnerman

While InfoVis and VAST have been expanding for the last decade, SciVis seems to be, in general, contracting. This apparent contraction coincides roughly with Bill Lorenson’s famous paper on the Death of Visualization. This panel discusses what appears to be a trend of the SciVis track of the conference contracting. This panel addresses some very challenging, core, fundamental questions.

How data visualization and regulation meet on the modern web

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26TH
2:00PM-3:40PM
Location: Holiday 6

Organizer: Georges Grinstein
Panelists: Robert Baker, Betsy Beaumon, Karl Groves, Mike Paciello, Joss Stubblefield

Individuals with accessibility issues are not able to access much of our work in visualization and we, as a community, have not paid a great deal of attention to that community. This panel will address the misconceptions, the law, and the steps that need to be taken to resolve this.

How can we improve empirical research on understanding visual information?

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27TH
10:30AM-12:10PM
Location: Key 3+4+6

Organizer: Steve Haroz
Panelists: Pierre Dragicevic, Ronald Rensink, Jessica Hullman, Matthew Kay

Empirical scientific research comprises many stages, including choosing research questions, designing experiments, analyzing data, drawing conclusions, and effectively communicating the entire process. This panel will discuss various approaches to these stages and debate how empirical research in visualization can improve.

Application Papers: What are they and how should they be evaluated?

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27TH
2:00PM-3:40PM
Location: Key 1+2+5

Organizer: Gunther Weber
Panelists: Sheelagh Carpendale, David Ebert, Brian Fisher, Hans Hagen, Ben Shneiderman, Anders Ynnerman

This panel will start a discussion in the community about what goals an application paper ought to have, what its main contributions to the state of art of visualization should be, and how it ought to be evaluated by reviewers. How do we as a community generate clear evaluation criteria for this type of paper?

Pathways for Theoretical Advances in Visualization

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27TH
4:15PM-5:55PM
Location: Holiday 6

Organizer: Min Chen
Panelists: Georges Grinstein, Chris Johnson, Jessie Kennedy, Tamara Munzner, Melanie Tory

This panel focuses on the question “How can we build a theoretic foundation for visualization collectively as a community?” The panellists will envision the pathways in four different aspects of a theoretic foundation, namely (i) taxonomies and ontologies, (ii) principles and guidelines, (iii) conceptual models and theoretic frameworks, and (iv) quantitative laws and theoretic systems.

Critical Visualization

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28TH
8:30AM-10:10AM
Location: Holiday 6

Organizer: Angus Forbes
Panelists: Marian Dörk, Jessica Hullman, Dietmar Offenhuber, Adam Trowbridge, Jessica Westbrook

How could a critical approach to visualization promote disclosure, plurality, contingency, and empowerment? What opportunities are there for incorporating human-centered inquiry into visualization research? Does articulating value, bias, and ideology have a place in scientific discourse? The Critical Visualization panel will introduce the diverse work of the four panelists and provide a forum for discussing critical approaches to visualization.