Workshops

2nd Workshop on Eye Tracking and Visualization (ETVIS)

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23
8:30AM-5:55PM
Location: Peale A+B+C

Daniel Weiskopf (University of Stuttgart), Michael Burch (University of Stuttgart), Lewis Chuang (Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics), Andrew Duchowski (Clemson University)

Contact: weiskopf@visus.uni-stuttgart.de

There is a growing interest in eye tracking as a research method in many communities because progress in hardware technology and the reduction of costs for eye tracking devices have made this analysis technique accessible to a large population of researchers. Nonetheless, standardized practices for technical implementations and data interpretation remain unresolved. With this Workshop on Eye Tracking and Visualization (ETVIS), we intend to build a community of eye tracking researchers within the visualization community, covering information visualization, scientific visualization, and visual analytics. We also aim to establish connections to related fields, in particular, in human-computer interaction, cognitive science, and psychology.

Creation, Curation, Critique and Conditioning of Principles and Guidelines in Visualization (C4PGV)

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23
8:30AM-12:10PM
Location: Holiday 6

Rita Borgo (Swansea University), Nadia Boukhelifa (Telecom ParisTech & CNRS LTCI), Kelly Gaither (University of Texas, Austin), Michael Sedlmair (Vienna University)

Contact: r.borgo@swansea.ac.uk

C4PGV 2016 is a forum that provides an opportunity to discuss state-of-the-art and present novel contributions towards the development of a theoretical foundation for Visualization and Visual Analytics. There are three challenges that will be addressed in the workshop: (1) the lack of a centralized place for easy discovery of known or proposed principles and guidelines; (2) the lack of documentation about when and where a principle or guideline is applicable and when and where it is not, as well as examples for attesting either conditions; and (3) the lack of platforms (except formal publications) for supporting the evolution and improvement of principles and guidelines, and fostering early proposal of principles and guidelines.

LIVVIL: Logging Interactive Visualizations & Visualizing Interaction Logs

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23
8:30AM-12:10PM
Location: Latrobe

Romain Vuillemot (Harvard University), Jeremy Boy (United Nations), Aurélien Tabard (Université Lyon1), Charles Perin (University of Calgary), Jean-Daniel Fekete (INRIA)

Contact: romain.vuillemot@gmail.com

Logs recording and analysis is a very powerful mechanism to improve the usability of tools and enrich the user experience with history. This workshop aims at bringing the visualization community together to share their practice on all aspect of logging, ranging from reporting, analysis, to visualization and its underlying infrastructure. Expected benefits include raising awareness on the potentials of logging for visualization, providing shared tools and methods to instrument visualizations, show how logging can improve visualization and interaction techniques, and scale to large number of users and sessions.

Innovations in the Pedagogy of Data Visualization

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23
2:00PM-5:55PM
Location: Johnson A+B

Eytan Adar (University of Michigan), Sophie Engle (University of San Francisco), Marti Hearst (University of California Berkeley), Alark Joshi (University of San Francisco), Daniel Keefe (University of Minnesota)

Contact: apjoshi@usfca.edu

The pedagogy of data visualization is becoming increasingly important as data visualization techniques and tools proliferate. In this workshop, we propose to create a community of practice that supports each other as they learn to be better teachers in their respective classrooms. Based on the well attended panels at IEEE Vis in 2010 and 2015, there is a strong interest in the data visualization community for exploring the pedagogy of data visualization. We propose the conduct a half-day interactive workshop that will include lightning talks followed by a discussion on strategies to further sustain the community of practice of data visualization educators.

Discovery Jam

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24
8:30AM-12:10PM
Location: Holiday 6

David Rogers (Los Alamos National Lab), Dan Keefe (University of Minnesota), Miriah Meyer (University of Utah), Francesca Samsel (University of Texas at Austin), Cecilia Aragon (University of Washington)

Contact: miriah@cs.utah.edu

Join us in the first Discovery Jam in a design sprint for scientific discovery. Think of it as a “Game Jam for Science”. Guest scientists will present data-centric discovery challenge problems, then you’ll collaborate in a small team (with a scientist) to brainstorm, design, and present pitches of your innovative ideas. Modern science requires a data-intensive approach melding expertise from many disciplines, but this is difficult to achieve. A new, perhaps even disruptive, approach is needed. This workshop will demonstrate the culture of collaboration that we believe will help scientists, technologists, designers and artists work together to innovate designs, methods, and tools for scientific discovery.

Workshop on Visualization for the Digital Humanities

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24
8:30AM-5:55PM
Location: Johnson A+B

Christopher Collins (University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Canada), Michael Correll (University of Washington, USA), Mennatallah El-Assady (University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Canada), Stefan Jänicke (University of Leipzig, Germany), Daniel Keim (University of Konstanz, Germany)

Contact: mcorrell@cs.wisc.edu

Despite the growing popularity of digital methods for research in the humanities, digital humanists are underserved by academics in visualization, and under-represented in visualization conferences. Addressing this deficit requires exposure to the specific data issues and epistemologies of humanities scholars, interdisciplinary collaboration, and steering of future research directions. The purpose of this workshop is to propose new research directions in visualization for the digital humanities, to familiarize the visualization research community with the problems faced by digital humanities researchers, and to foster future collaboration between visualization and digital humanities research.

The Event Event: Workshop on Temporal & Sequential Event Analysis

Adam Perer (IBM Research), Steven Drucker (Microsoft Research), Danyel Fisher (Microsoft Research), David Gotz (UNC-Chapel Hill), Megan Monroe (IBM Research), Ben Shneiderman (University of Maryland), Catherine Plaisant (University of Maryland)

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24
2:00PM-5:55PM
Location: Peale A+B+C

Contact: adam.perer@gmail.com

An ongoing visualization challenge is often to leverage the voluminous data that is being captured to drive decision making and insights. Common to such data are temporal events, data points with both a timestamp and event type, so understanding patterns of temporal event sequences is an important problem to many domains. Recently, there has been an increasing amount of visualization research focusing on temporal events. The main question behind the proposed workshop is: How can we unify and advance the role of visualization in temporal event analysis? The workshop will gather visualization researchers together to discuss the interesting opportunities and challenges visualization may face with temporal events.

Workshop on Visualization in Practice: Open Source Visualization and Visual Analytics Software

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24
2:00PM-5:55PM
Location: Holiday 6

Bernd Hentschel (RWTH Aachen University), Alan Keahey (IBM Research), Daniela Oelke (Siemens AG), Justin Talbot (Tableau Research)

Contact: vip@ieeevis.org

The 2016 Workshop on Visualization in Practice is an opportunity for visualization practitioners and researchers to meet and share experiences, insights, and ideas in applying the latest visualization and visual analytics research to real world problems. The focus of this year’s workshop will be the design, development, distribution, and application of open source visualization and visual analytics software. The workshop will include an invited keynote, a session of talks, and a poster session in which live demonstrations of open source tools will be given.